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dc.contributor.authorMueller, Y*
dc.contributor.authorMbulamberi, Dawson B*
dc.contributor.authorOdermatt, Peter*
dc.contributor.authorHoffmann, Axel*
dc.contributor.authorLoutan, Louis*
dc.contributor.authorChappuis, François*
dc.date.accessioned2010-02-05T23:19:49Z
dc.date.available2010-02-05T23:19:49Z
dc.date.issued2009-08
dc.identifier.citationRisk factors for in-hospital mortality of visceral leishmaniasis patients in eastern Uganda. 2009, 14 (8):910-7 Trop. Med. Int. Healthen
dc.identifier.issn1365-3156
dc.identifier.pmid19552645
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1365-3156.2009.02305.x
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10144/91286
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: To identify risk factors for in-hospital mortality in patients treated for visceral leishmaniasis (VL) in Uganda. METHODS: Retrospective analysis of VL patients' clinical data collected for project monitoring by Médecins Sans Frontières in Amudat, eastern Uganda. RESULTS: Between 2000 and 2005, of 3483 clinically suspect patients, 53% were confirmed with primary VL. Sixty-two per cent were children <16 years of age with a male/female ratio of 2.2. The overall case-fatality rate during pentavalent antimonial (n = 1641) or conventional amphotericin B treatment (n = 217) was 3.7%. There was no difference in the case-fatality rate between treatment groups (P > 0.20). The main risk factors for in-hospital death identified by a multivariate analysis were age <6 years and >15 years, concomitant tuberculosis or hepatopathy, and drug-related adverse events. The case-fatality rate among patients >45 years of age was strikingly high (29.0%). CONCLUSION: Subgroups of VL patients at higher risk of death during treatment with drugs currently available in Uganda were identified. Less toxic drugs should be evaluated and used in these patients.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsArchived on this site with the kind permission of Wiley-Blackwell, [url]http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/loi/tmi[/url]en
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten
dc.subject.meshAdulten
dc.subject.meshAntiprotozoal Agentsen
dc.subject.meshChilden
dc.subject.meshChild, Preschoolen
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshHospital Mortalityen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshInfanten
dc.subject.meshInfant, Newbornen
dc.subject.meshLeishmaniasis, Visceralen
dc.subject.meshMaleen
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden
dc.subject.meshRetrospective Studiesen
dc.subject.meshRisk Factorsen
dc.subject.meshTreatment Outcomeen
dc.subject.meshUgandaen
dc.subject.meshYoung Adulten
dc.titleRisk factors for in-hospital mortality of visceral leishmaniasis patients in eastern Uganda.en
dc.contributor.departmentMédecins Sans Frontières, Geneva, Switzerland. yolanda.muller@geneva.msf.orgen
dc.identifier.journalTropical Medicine & International Health : TM & IHen
refterms.dateFOA2019-03-04T15:38:00Z
html.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: To identify risk factors for in-hospital mortality in patients treated for visceral leishmaniasis (VL) in Uganda. METHODS: Retrospective analysis of VL patients' clinical data collected for project monitoring by Médecins Sans Frontières in Amudat, eastern Uganda. RESULTS: Between 2000 and 2005, of 3483 clinically suspect patients, 53% were confirmed with primary VL. Sixty-two per cent were children <16 years of age with a male/female ratio of 2.2. The overall case-fatality rate during pentavalent antimonial (n = 1641) or conventional amphotericin B treatment (n = 217) was 3.7%. There was no difference in the case-fatality rate between treatment groups (P > 0.20). The main risk factors for in-hospital death identified by a multivariate analysis were age <6 years and >15 years, concomitant tuberculosis or hepatopathy, and drug-related adverse events. The case-fatality rate among patients >45 years of age was strikingly high (29.0%). CONCLUSION: Subgroups of VL patients at higher risk of death during treatment with drugs currently available in Uganda were identified. Less toxic drugs should be evaluated and used in these patients.


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