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dc.contributor.authorGerstl, Sibylle
dc.contributor.authorDunkley, Sophie
dc.contributor.authorMukhtar, Ahmed
dc.contributor.authorBaker, Samuel
dc.contributor.authorMaikere, Jacob
dc.date.accessioned2010-05-13T20:48:02Z
dc.date.available2010-05-13T20:48:02Z
dc.date.issued2010-02-01
dc.identifier.citationSuccessful introduction of artesunate combination therapy is not enough to fight malaria: results from an adherence study in Sierra Leone. 2010:notTrans R Soc Trop Med Hygen
dc.identifier.issn1878-3503
dc.identifier.pmid20129636
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.trstmh.2009.12.008
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10144/98691
dc.description.abstractA study to measure adherence to artesunate and amodiaquine (AS+AQ) therapy in patients treated for uncomplicated malaria in community health centres (CHC) was conducted in Sierra Leone. Patients/caretakers were interviewed and remaining AS+AQ tablets at home after the last treatment dose were counted. Persons leaving CHCs with an AS+AQ prescription were also interviewed (exit interviews). In total, 118 patients were visited at home: 27 (22.9%) had one or more tablets left and were classed as certainly non-adherent; 34 (28.8%) were probably non-adherent [reported incorrect (n=27) or incomplete (n=7) intake]; and 57 (48.3%) were probably adherent. The main reasons for incomplete intake were sickness after one dose of AS+AQ, no food available for drug intake and forgetting to take them. For incorrect intake, reasons were vomiting after drug intake and incorrect instructions given by the CHC. Eighty-one percent of probably adherent patients reported following instructions given to them. In exit interviews, 82% of patients or caretakers of patients were able to repeat AS+AQ intake instructions correctly. Adherence to antimalarial treatment should not be taken for granted. Instructions on correct AS+AQ use should include discussion of disease symptoms as well as possible treatment side effects and how to manage them. Other factors are more difficult to influence, such as patients forgetting to take the treatment.
dc.languageENG
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsPublished by Elsevier Archived on this site with the kind permission of Elsevier Ltd. ([url]http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/journal/00359203[/url]) and the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene ([url]http://www.rstmh.org/transactions.asp[/url])en
dc.titleSuccessful introduction of artesunate combination therapy is not enough to fight malaria: results from an adherence study in Sierra Leone.en
dc.contributor.departmentMédecins Sans Frontières (MSF) UK, 67-74 Saffron Hill, London EC1N 8QX, UK.en
dc.identifier.journalTransactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygieneen
refterms.dateFOA2019-03-04T15:39:35Z
html.description.abstractA study to measure adherence to artesunate and amodiaquine (AS+AQ) therapy in patients treated for uncomplicated malaria in community health centres (CHC) was conducted in Sierra Leone. Patients/caretakers were interviewed and remaining AS+AQ tablets at home after the last treatment dose were counted. Persons leaving CHCs with an AS+AQ prescription were also interviewed (exit interviews). In total, 118 patients were visited at home: 27 (22.9%) had one or more tablets left and were classed as certainly non-adherent; 34 (28.8%) were probably non-adherent [reported incorrect (n=27) or incomplete (n=7) intake]; and 57 (48.3%) were probably adherent. The main reasons for incomplete intake were sickness after one dose of AS+AQ, no food available for drug intake and forgetting to take them. For incorrect intake, reasons were vomiting after drug intake and incorrect instructions given by the CHC. Eighty-one percent of probably adherent patients reported following instructions given to them. In exit interviews, 82% of patients or caretakers of patients were able to repeat AS+AQ intake instructions correctly. Adherence to antimalarial treatment should not be taken for granted. Instructions on correct AS+AQ use should include discussion of disease symptoms as well as possible treatment side effects and how to manage them. Other factors are more difficult to influence, such as patients forgetting to take the treatment.


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