Now showing items 1-20 of 2568

    • "Even if she's really sick at home, she will pretend that everything is fine.": Delays in seeking care and treatment for advanced HIV disease in Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo.

      Venables, E; Casteels, I; Manziasi Sumbi, E; Goemaere, E (Public Library of Science, 2019-02-13)
      HIV prevalence in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) is estimated to be 1.2%, and access to HIV testing and treatment remains low across the country. Despite advances in treatment, HIV continues to be one of the main reasons for hospitalisation and death in low- and middle-income countries, including DRC, but the reasons why people delay seeking health-care when they are extremely sick remain little understood. People in Kinshasa, DRC, continue to present to health-care facilities in an advanced stage of HIV when they are close to death and needing intensive treatment.
    • Mortality in the first six months among HIV-positive and HIV-negative patients empirically treated for tuberculosis.

      Huerga, H; Ferlazzo, G; Wanjala, S; Bastard, M; Bevilacqua, P; Ardizzoni, E; Sitienei, J; Bonnet, M (BioMed Central, 2019-02-11)
      Empirical treatment of tuberculosis (TB) may be necessary in patients with negative or no Xpert MTB/RIF results. In a context with access to Xpert, we assessed mortality in the 6 months after the initial TB consultation among HIV-positive and HIV-negative patients who received empirical TB treatment or TB treatment based on bacteriological confirmation and we compared it with the mortality among those who did not receive TB treatment.
    • Diagnostics for filovirus detection: impact of recent outbreaks on the diagnostic landscape

      Emperador DM; Mazzola LT; Trainor BW; Chua A; Kelly-Cirino C (BMJ Publishing Group, 2019-02-07)
      Ebolaviruses and Marburg virus (MARV) both belong to the family Filoviridae and cause severe haemorrhagic fever in humans. Due to high mortality rates and potential for spread from rural to urban regions, they are listed on the WHO R&D blueprint of high-priority pathogens. Recent ebolavirus outbreaks in Western and Central Africa have highlighted the importance of diagnostic testing in epidemic preparedness for these pathogens and led to the rapid development of a number of commercially available benchtop and point-of-care nucleic acid amplification tests as well as serological assays and rapid diagnostic tests. Despite these advancements, challenges still remain. While products approved under emergency use licenses during outbreak periods may continue to be used post-outbreak, a lack of clarity and incentive surrounding the regulatory approval pathway during non-outbreak periods has deterred many manufacturers from seeking full approvals. Waning of funding and poor access to samples after the 2014–2016 outbreak also contributed to cessation of development once the outbreak was declared over. There is a need for tests with improved sensitivity and specificity, and assays that can use alternative sample types could reduce the need for invasive procedures and expensive equipment, making testing in field conditions more feasible. For MARV, availability of diagnostic tests is still limited, restricted to a single ELISA test and assay panels designed to differentiate between multiple pathogens. It may be helpful to extend the target product profile for ebolavirus diagnostics to include MARV, as the viruses have many overlapping characteristics.
    • Demonstration of the Diagnostic Agreement of Capillary and Venous Blood Samples, Using Hepatitis-C Virus SD Bioline© Rapid Test: A Clinic-based Study

      Sun, C; Iwamoto, M; Calzia, A; Sreng, B; Yann, S; Pin, S; Lastrucci, C; Kimchamroeun, S; Dimanche, C; Dousset, JP; Le Paih, M; Balkan, S; Marquardt, T; Carnimeo, V; Lissouba, P; Maman, D; Loarec, A (Elsevier, 2019-02)
      Simplifying hepatitis C virus (HCV) screening is a key step in achieving the elimination of HCV as a global public health threat by 2030.
    • Accelerating the Elimination of Viral Hepatitis: a Lancet Gastroenterology & Hepatology Commission.

      Cooke, GS; Andrieux-Meyer, I; Applegate, TL; Atun, R; Burry, JR; Cheinquer, H; Dusheiko, G; Feld, JJ; Gore, C; Griswold, MG; Hamid, S; Hellard, ME; Hou, J; Howell, J; Jia, J; Kravchenko, N; Lazarus, JV; Lemoine, M; Lesi, OA; Maistat, L; McMahon, BJ; Razavi, H; Roberts, TR; Simmons, B; Sonderup, MW; Spearman, WC; Taylor, BE; Thomas, DL; Waked, I; Ward, JW; Wiktor, SZ (Elsevier, 2019-02-01)
      Viral hepatitis is a major public health threat and a leading cause of death worldwide. Annual mortality from viral hepatitis is similar to that of other major infectious diseases such as HIV and tuberculosis. Highly effective prevention measures and treatments have made the global elimination of viral hepatitis a realistic goal, endorsed by all WHO member states. Ambitious targets call for a global reduction in hepatitis-related mortality of 65% and a 90% reduction in new infections by 2030. This Commission draws together a wide range of expertise to appraise the current global situation and to identify priorities globally, regionally, and nationally needed to accelerate progress. We identify 20 heavily burdened countries that account for over 75% of the global burden of viral hepatitis. Key recommendations include a greater focus on national progress towards elimination with support given, if necessary, through innovative financing measures to ensure elimination programmes are fully funded by 2020. In addition to further measures to improve access to vaccination and treatment, greater attention needs to be paid to access to affordable, high-quality diagnostics if testing is to reach the levels needed to achieve elimination goals. Simplified, decentralised models of care removing requirements for specialised prescribing will be required to reach those in need, together with sustained efforts to tackle stigma and discrimination. We identify key examples of the progress that has already been made in many countries throughout the world, demonstrating that sustained and coordinated efforts can be successful in achieving the WHO elimination goals.
    • Post-traumatic osteomyelitis in Middle East war-wounded civilians: resistance to first-line antibiotics in selected bacteria over the decade 2006-2016.

      Fily, F; Ronat, JB; Malou, N; Kanapathipillai, R; Seguin, C; Hussein, N; Fakhri, RM; Langendorf, C (BioMed Central, 2019-01-31)
      War-wounded civilians in Middle East countries are at risk of post-traumatic osteomyelitis (PTO). We aimed to describe and compare the bacterial etiology and proportion of first-line antibiotics resistant bacteria (FLAR) among PTO cases in civilians from Syria, Iraq and Yemen admitted to the reconstructive surgical program of Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) in Amman, Jordan, and to identify risk factors for developing PTO with FLAR bacteria.
    • A Randomized Trial of AmBisome Monotherapy and AmBisome and Miltefosine Combination to Treat Visceral leishmaniasis in HIV Co-infected Patients in Ethiopia

      Diro, E; Blesson, S; Edwards, T; Ritmeijer, K; Fikre, H; Admassu, H; Kibret, A; Ellis, SJ; Bardonneau, C; Zijlstra, EE; Soipei, P; Mutinda, B; Omollo, R; Kimutai, R; Omwalo, G; Wasunna, M; Tadesse, F; Alves, F; Strub-Wourgaft, N; Hailu, A; Alexander, N; Alvar, J (Public Library of Science, 2019-01-17)
      Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) co-infected patients requires special case management. AmBisome monotherapy at 40 mg/kg is recommended by the World Health Organization. The objective of the study was to assess if a combination of a lower dose of AmBisome with miltefosine would show acceptable efficacy at the end of treatment.
    • 'I saw it as a second chance': A qualitative exploration of experiences of treatment failure and regimen change among people living with HIV on second- and third-line antiretroviral therapy in Kenya, Malawi and Mozambique

      Burns, R; Borges, J; Blasco, P; Vandenbulcke, A; Mukui, I; Magalasi, D; Molfino, L; Manuel, R; Schramm, B; Wringe, A (Taylor & Francis, 2019-01-11)
      Increasing numbers of people living with HIV (PLHIV) in sub-Saharan Africa are experiencing failure of first-line antiretroviral therapy and transitioning onto second-line regimens. However, there is a dearth of research on their treatment experiences. We conducted in-depth interviews with 43 PLHIV on second- or third-line antiretroviral therapy and 15 HIV health workers in Kenya, Malawi and Mozambique to explore patients' and health workers' perspectives on these transitions. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed and translated into English. Data were coded inductively and analysed thematically. In all settings, experiences of treatment failure and associated episodes of ill-health disrupted daily social and economic activities, and recalled earlier fears of dying from HIV. Transitioning onto more effective regimens often represented a second (or third) chance to (re-)engage with HIV care, with patients prioritising their health over other aspects of their lives. However, many patients struggled to maintain these transformations, particularly when faced with persistent social challenges to pill-taking, alongside the burden of more complex regimens and an inability to mobilise sufficient resources to accommodate change. Efforts to identify treatment failure and support regimen change must account for these patients' unique illness and treatment histories, and interventions should incorporate tailored counselling and social and economic support. Abbreviations: ART: Antiretroviral therapy; HIV: Human immunodeficiency virus; IDI: In-depth interview; MSF: Médecins Sans Frontières; PLHIV: People living with HIV.
    • Reducing Lead and Silica Dust Exposures in Small-Scale Mining in Northern Nigeria.

      Gottesfeld, P; Tirima, S; Anka, SM; Fotso, A; Nota, MM (2019-01-07)
      An ongoing health crisis across a large area of Northern Nigeria has resulted in hundreds of deaths and thousands of cases of lead poisoning from artisanal small-scale gold mining. Occupational Knowledge International (OK International) and Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) have formed a partnership to conduct a pilot project to introduce safer mining practices in selected communities. The primary objective was to reduce lead exposures among artisanal small-scale miners and minimize take home exposures by reducing dust contamination on clothing and body surfaces.
    • Genomic Insights into the 2016-2017 Cholera Epidemic in Yemen

      Weill, FX; Domman, D; Njamkepo, E; Almesbahi, AA; Naji, M; Nasher, SS; Rakesh, A; Assiri, AM; Sharma, NC; Kariuki, S; Pourshafie, MR; Rauzier, J; Abubakar, A; Carter, JY; Wamala, JF; Seguin, C; Bouchier, C; Malliavin, T; Bakhshi, B; Abulmaali, HHN; Kumar, D; Njoroge, SM; Malik, MR; Kiiru, J; Luquero, FJ; Azman, AS; Ramamurthy, T; Thomson, NR; Quilici, ML (Nature Publishing Group, 2019-01-02)
      Yemen is currently experiencing, to our knowledge, the largest cholera epidemic in recent history. The first cases were declared in September 2016, and over 1.1 million cases and 2,300 deaths have since been reported1. Here we investigate the phylogenetic relationships, pathogenesis and determinants of antimicrobial resistance by sequencing the genomes of Vibrio cholerae isolates from the epidemic in Yemen and recent isolates from neighbouring regions. These 116 genomic sequences were placed within the phylogenetic context of a global collection of 1,087 isolates of the seventh pandemic V. cholerae serogroups O1 and O139 biotype El Tor2-4. We show that the isolates from Yemen that were collected during the two epidemiological waves of the epidemic1-the first between 28 September 2016 and 23 April 2017 (25,839 suspected cases) and the second beginning on 24 April 2017 (more than 1 million suspected cases)-are V. cholerae serotype Ogawa isolates from a single sublineage of the seventh pandemic V. cholerae O1 El Tor (7PET) lineage. Using genomic approaches, we link the epidemic in Yemen to global radiations of pandemic V. cholerae and show that this sublineage originated from South Asia and that it caused outbreaks in East Africa before appearing in Yemen. Furthermore, we show that the isolates from Yemen are susceptible to several antibiotics that are commonly used to treat cholera and to polymyxin B, resistance to which is used as a marker of the El Tor biotype.
    • Demanding an end to tuberculosis: treatment of tuberculosis infection among persons living with and without HIV

      Fargher, J; Reuter, A; Furin, J (Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins, 2019-01-01)
      More than two billion people are infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis and few of them are ever offered therapy in spite of such treatment being associated with reduced rates of morbidity and mortality. This article reviews the current recommendations on the diagnosis and treatment of TB infection (or what is commonly referred to as 'prophylaxis' or 'preventive therapy' of latent TB) and discusses barriers to implementation that have led to low demand for this life-saving therapeutic intervention.
    • Strategies for access to affordable hepatitis C testing and treatment in Asia

      Khwairakpam, G; Burry, J (2019-01)
      With increasing availability of generic direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) and associated price reductions, various governments, multilateral institutions, and donors have started providing testing and treatment for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. More data on the quality of these generic medicines and on cost-effectiveness of their use are becoming widely available. This review seeks to describe some of the treatment programs for HCV that are evolving in Cambodia, India, Indonesia, Malaysia, Myanmar, and Thailand.
    • Female Genital Schistosomiasis and HIV: Research urgently needed to improve understanding of the health impacts of this important co-infection

      O’Brien, DP; Ford, N; Djirmay, AG; Calmy, A; Vitoria, M; Jensen, TO; Christinet, V (Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2019-01)
      Evidence suggests that there are important interactions between HIV and Female Genital Schistosomiasis (FGS) that may have significant effects on individual and population health. However, the exact way they interact and the health impacts of the interactions are not well understood. In this paper we discuss what is known about the interactions between FGS and HIV, and the potential impact of the interactions. This includes the likelihood that FGS is an important health problem for HIV positive women in schistosoma-endemic areas potentially associated with an increased risk of mortality, cancer and infertility. Additionally, it may be significantly impacting the HIV epidemic in sub-Saharan Africa by making young women more susceptible to HIV. We call for immediate action and argue that research is urgently required to address these knowledge gaps and propose a research agenda to achieve this.
    • Beyond 'cure' and 'treatment success': quality of life of patients with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis

      Laxmeshwar, C; Stewart, A G; Dalal, A; Kumar, A M V; Kalaiselvi, S; Das, M; Gawde, N; Thi, S S; Isaakidis, P (International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease, 2019-01-01)
      Two drug-resistant tuberculosis (DR-TB) sites (MSF Clinic, Jupiter Hospital) in Mumbai, India.
    • "Is it making any difference?" A qualitative study examining the treatment-taking experiences of asymptomatic people living with HIV in the context of Treat-all in Eswatini

      Horter, S; Wringe, A; Thabede, Z; Dlamini, V; Kerschberger, B; Pasipamire, M; Lukhele, N; Rusch, B; Seeley, J (International AIDS Society, 2019-01)
      Treat-all is being implemented in several African settings, in accordance with 2015 World Health Organisation guidelines. The factors known to undermine adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) may change in the context of Treat-all, where people living with HIV (PLHIV) increasingly initiate ART at earlier, asymptomatic stages of disease, soon after diagnosis. This paper aimed to examine the asymptomatic PLHIV's experiences engaging with early ART initiation under the Treat-all policy, including how they navigate treatment-taking over the longer term.
    • Access to Care for Non-Communicable Diseases in Mosul, Iraq Between 2014 and 2017: A Rapid Qualitative Study.

      Baxter, LM; Eldin, MS; Al Mohammed, A; Saim, M; Checchi, F (BioMed Central, 2018-12-29)
      During June 2014 to April 2017, the population of Mosul, Iraq lived in a state of increasing isolation from the rest of Iraq due to the city's occupation by the Islamic State group. As part of a study to develop a generalisable method for estimating the excess burden of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) in conflict-affected settings, in April-May 2017 we conducted a brief qualitative study of self-reported care for NCDs among 15 adult patients who had fled Mosul and presented to Médecins Sans Frontières clinics in the Kurdistan region with hypertension and/or diabetes. Participants reported consistent barriers to NCD care during the so-called Islamic State period, including drug shortages, insecurity and inability to afford privately sold medication. Coping strategies included drug rationing. By 2016, all patients had completely or partially lost access to care. Though limited, this study suggests a profound effect of the conflict on NCD burden.
    • From Risk to Care: The Hepatitis C Screening and Diagnostic Cascade in a Primary Health Care Clinic in Karachi, Pakistan—a Cohort Study

      Khalid, GG; Kyaw, KWY; Bousquet, C; Auat, R; Donchuk, D; Trickey, A; Hamid, S; Qureshi, H; Mazzeo, V; Aslam, K; Khowaja, S; Van den Bergh, R; Operational Center Brussels, Médecins Sans Frontières, Islamabad, Pakistan; Department of Operational Research, International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease, Mandalay, Myanmar; Operational Center Brussels, Médecins Sans Frontières, Islamabad, Pakistan; Operational Center Brussels, Brussels, Belgium; Operational Center Brussels, Brussels, Belgium; School of Social and Population Sciences, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK; Department of Medicine, Agha Khan Medical University, Karachi, Pakistan; Pakistan Health Research Council, Islamabad, Pakistan; Operational Center Brussels, Médecins Sans Frontières, Islamabad, Pakistan; Operational Center Brussels, Médecins Sans Frontières, Islamabad, Pakistan; Operational Center Brussels, Médecins Sans Frontières, Islamabad, Pakistan; Operational Center Brussels, Brussels, Belgium (Oxford University Press, 2018-12-28)
      Background In the high-prevalence setting of Pakistan, screening, diagnosis and treatment services for chronic hepatitis C (CHC) patients are commonly offered in specialized facilities. We aimed to describe the cascade of care in a Médecins Sans Frontières primary health care clinic offering CHC care in an informal settlement in Karachi, Pakistan. Methods This was a retrospective cohort analysis using routinely collected data. Three different screening algorithms were assessed among patients with one or more CHC risk factors. Results Among the 87 348 patients attending the outpatient clinic, 5003 (6%) presented with one or more risk factors. Rapid diagnostic test (RDT) positivity was 38% overall. Approximately 60% of the CHC patients across all risk categories were in the early stage of the disease, with an aspartate aminotransferase:platelet ratio index score <1. The sequential delays in the cascade differed between the three groups, with the interval between screening and treatment initiation being the shortest in the cohort tested with GeneXpert onsite. Conclusions Delays between screening and treatment can be reduced by putting in place more patient-centric testing algorithms. New strategies, to better identify and treat the hidden at-risk populations, should be developed and implemented.
    • Field Evaluation of Near Point of Care Cepheid GeneXpert HIV-1 Qual for Early Infant Diagnosis

      Opollo, VS; Nikuze, A; Ben-Farhat, J; Anyango, E; Humwa, F; Oyaro, B; Wanjala, S; Omwoyo, W; Majiwa, M; Akelo, V; Zeh, C; Maman, D (Public Library of Science, 2018-12-27)
      Access to point-of-care HIV testing shortens turn-around times, time to diagnosis and reduces loss to follow-up hence minimizing barriers to early linkage to care and treatment among HIV infected infants. Currently samples for early infant HIV diagnosis are sent to centralized testing facilities which are few and located only at specific regions in Kenya. However, there are Point of Care (POC) early infant diagnosis [EID] technologies elsewhere such as SAMBA and ALERE-Q that are yet to be evaluated in Kenya despite the urgent need for data to inform policy formulation regarding EID. The Cepheid GeneXpert HIV-1 Qual (GeneXpert) technology for POC EID offers a great opportunity to minimize HIV associated morbidity, mortality and loss to follow-up through decentralization of early infant HIV testing to the clinics. This technology also allows for same-day results thus facilitating prompt linkage to care.
    • Dual Screen and Confirm Rapid Test Does Not Reduce Overtreatment of Syphilis in Pregnant Women Living in a Non-venereal treponematoses Endemic Region: a Field Evaluation Among Antenatal Care Attendees in Burkina Faso

      Langendorf, C; Lastrucci, C; Sanou-Bicaba, I; Blackburn, K; Koudika, MH; Crucitti, T (BMJ Publishing Group, 2018-12-22)
      In resource-limited settings, screening pregnant women for syphilis using rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) is a key tool in the prevention of congenital syphilis. However, most syphilis RDTs detect only treponemal antibodies (T-RDT), meaning antibiotics may be provided unnecessarily to previously treated pregnant women, particularly in non-venereal treponematoses endemic regions. We estimated the potential reduction in overtreatment when comparing T-RDT (SD Bioline) to a newer rapid test (Dual Path Platform (DPP) Screen and Confirm Assay, Chembio) detecting both treponemal and non-treponemal antibodies.
    • Increased Hepatitis C Virus Co-infection and Injection Drug Use in HIV-infected Fishermen in Myanmar

      Ousley, J; Nesbitt, R; Kyaw, NTT; Bermudez, E; Soe, KP; Anicete, R; Mon, PE; Le Shwe Sin Ei, W; Christofani, S; Fernandez, M; Ciglenecki, I (BioMed Central, 2018-12-14)
      In Southeast Asia, though fishermen are known to be a key population at high risk of HIV, little is known about their co-infection rates with Hepatitis C virus (HCV), or how illness and risk behaviors vary by occupation or type of fishermen. In Myanmar, this lack of knowledge is particularly acute, despite the fact that much of the country's border is coastline.